Eumig

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EUMIG

 

 

Eumig P8

 

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I still can't warm to the P8. However, for those who can, here is a link to a website with lots of P8 info.

 

www.marriottworld.com/pieces/pieces25.htm

 

Eumig Mark S

 

An ad for the very first Mark S, sent in by John Fisher.

 

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John has gently pointed out my relative lack of material on the Mark S, and has been rummaging in

the archives. Here are some fruits of his research.

 

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The Mark S is from the days when projectors were real projectors, made mostly of metal, weighing a ton and using valves in the amp.

Even the relatively late model below was starting to go downhill I suspect, with plastic and transistors.

 

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Here's another circuit diagram from a different booklet.

 

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Interesting session with a Eumig Mark S. The problem being addressed was the motor mountings. In order to move to and fro to bring

the drive shaft into contact with the rubber discs that take the drive, the motor has to pivot. The pivot supports seem to comprise

eumigsome kind of plastic in the form of a trapezoid (if that is the correct name for a triangle wiv the top cut off) about 0.5" in most directions,

with a brass bush inserted. The trapezoids fit into appropriately shaped recesses. The originals are apparently prone to disintegrate, and

seemed to have done so in this case. Presumably, as Eumig went to the trouble of doing this, rather than just making holes in the supports

themselves, they saw a need for insulation, so I used nylon, about 6mm thick, cut and filed to shape. Tho' it might have been springiness -

the way the bits disintegrate reminds me of what happens with very old foam rubber/plastic eg as used to pack projector lamps. Here is a

pic of a machine with intact thingies - look rather manky to me, also these seem quite solid. You have to remove the amp and the fan

housing to get at the corresponding thingy further inside the machine.

 

While the thing was partly broken down, I thought I might as well give you a couple of shots of the amp.

 

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I had to hand some brass tube with an i/d of 4mm (matching the motor pivots), which I force-fitted into a hole in the nylon.

I wondered what people might be prepared to pay for a pair if they had this problem. I guess about 5 tops, which works out for me to a princely 2.50

per hour. So I'm unlikely to make any more. Typically, having done all this, I found some strange nylon triangles in an odd drawer of spares. I had not

previously identified them, but guess what they were?

Here's a later model.

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An unusually-coloured 8mm Eumig P26, with all sorts of complicated twiddly bits - gorgeous.

 

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